Charm A Sacred Nun

REMNANTS OF ORIGINAL SPACE (NOTES)

The captain realized the ship was going down. The raft. He ordered the rope be cut. Only fifteen survived. The moment they see the ship will save them on the horizon. And yet it is not a history paining. To replicate. To go to the morgue. To study everything to make it as precise as possible. For all of his efforts to be accurate. Going to the trial. As you said going to the morgue. Amputated arms and limbs. A mixture of the real and the unreal. Man and man. Man and nature. It’s about feeling. It’s about the physical body. A terrible despair. Apex of hope. Flag down that distant ship. A crescendo of optimism. Look at the

bodies. A receding diagonal. It was a horse riding accident. Critics call it the massacre of painting. You notice the sky. How it’s ugly. The whole landscape is vast emptiness. Against the seascape. It’s like you know an endless chasm of hell. Still fighting going on. Cities burning in the background. Men, women and children were all killed. This happened in the past. Studying older events and making it contemporary. The death of uh.

You know very emotional. Use of uh. An Assyrian king. He knew he was going to be overthrown so he took all his concubines and burned them. And the dogs. Yup he burned the dogs too. Cause you know he didn’t want anyone to errrr take anything. Photography. The dramatic. The naturalistic. The turbulent or fantastic nature of storms and avalanches. Closely observed images of tranquil nature. An English fellow. You see the ruins of this abbey. The trees are dead. Silhouette. Kinda has that feel. Very sparse. The dead of winter. Perhaps sunset. Remnants of original space. The futility of man. Nature is eternal but man is transient. Yup a gothic. Ancient rituals. Surrounded by snow. Fallen into disrepair.

Older than that are the oak trees. Terrifying. Beyond that the crescent moon! Oh it’s transhistorical. The cosmos even beyond earth! If there’s any optimism, it is the faintest crescent. The possibility of rebirth but spring will come! Bleak twilight. The cycles of the moon. I focus on the moon here. Yeah the moon. A very serious meaning. Transhistorical human feelings. Layers of time. The moon. Finding a new way to represent these eternal issues. A fashionable culture. It was just be implausible. Looking toward the very extreme north. Expressing the eternal. This very foreboding landscape. Very hash. Emotional moment. Isolated person out on a cliff looking out and contemplating the vastness he sees before him. The mist. Uncertainty. Cloak of emotional tension. The artist is so solitary. A little crazy. More raw than the other guy. Slave ship. Bodies rising up in the water.

Using the sea as a palate of emotional turmoil. You could say that the sky is on fire. The reproduction is always better than the projection. Boiling up in the storm. Bleeding up in the water. Harsh light. Another parallel. Typhoon coming on. Typical sunset. Thick sensuality. In a moment of horror, I see a foot! All of the sudden, there’s real carnage! Collecting insurance. Parts of their bodies. The power of nature and this horrific human act. This sense of divine retribution. The punishment of nature. The indifference of nature.

Nature is completely indifferent to the human endeavors. The British had outlawed slavery. This idea that human beings could do this to each other. Just for the sake of money. Hideous act. Mist of night. Death upon the guilty ship. Lines of blood.

Sandra Simonds

if you are feeling the need to “like” me :)

My 3rd book, The Sonnets, available in November from Bloof Books! 

My 3rd book, The Sonnets, available in November from Bloof Books! 

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"In fact many romantic artists and other hardy pioneers in subsequent generations conceived of the condition (the condition of alienation) as a source of pride, a chance to hurl a haughty defiance, titanic and Promethean, against man, history and God. Forced to live in the desert of his own surrender or on the mountain of his own solitude, the artist found compensation in that heroic doom which Baudelaire called both his curse and his blessing. Using terms suggested by Nietzsche, we might say that the artist believed himself capable of sublimating that fatal and fateful malady into an almost superhuman creative energy, which the German philosopher supposed to be the basis for all mental and spiritual health. The artist hoped to succeed in realizing his self and his work by the way of sin and transgression. He hoped to get a taste of the FRUIT OF THE TREE OF KNOWLEDGE through disobedience and revolt. He thus seemed to become, as Rimbaud wrote, "le grand malade, le grand criminel, le grand maudit, et let supreme savant."

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3 Women, Robert Altman, 1977

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The million dollar question for me in this movie is this: Why is Millie Lammoreaux socially ostracized in the way that she is? I suspect if we know the answer to this question, we gain some insight into 3 Women. In a world of Facebook likes and Favorites, I guess her situation could be translated into zero likes and zero favorites.

She invites you over for tuna melts and she gets no likes. Oh but wait, back up, I’m totally wrong. She gets one like! And that one like comes from the person she doesn’t want a like from: Pinky Rose, the childlike dum dum who thinks Millie is the most amazing thing she’s ever seen. Oh yes, she also gets one more like—from the married dude with the pregnant wife (the 3rd woman) in the film who eventually gives birth (surprise!) to a stillborn baby. 

This movie reminded me a lot of Persona, except Altman added a third character, who’s supposed to be (from the imaginings of a male director) a young woman’s worst nightmare. The 3rd woman is mute and pregnant and draws disturbing pictures everywhere. It made me think that perhaps the fears of young women (getting old, having a baby, men not desiring you anymore) are also the fears of patriarchy. Hint: the problem with patriarchy is not older, pregnant women.  

There’s something “off” about all of these characters. One thing I noticed was that Millie’s dress was constantly caught in the car door. She’s sort of oblivious to everything. She doesn’t get her own lack of desirability and even when people make fun of her in front of her face, she just doesn’t get it. So when she finally takes home the married guy (who also happens to own the apartment building and the bar that the girls frequent) she’s super pissed when Pinky tells her not to (“his wife’s pregnant, Pinky says) and Millie says that Pinky shouldn’t interfere with her business….

Which is when Pinky attempts suicide by jumping into the swimming pool. Lots of twists and turns but Pinky emerges from the coma from the suicide attempt and then starts drinking and smoking and sleeping with the married dude. So, Pinky becomes Millie and now Millie is freaking out.

So, it seems to be about the balance and order between these two women. Who’s going to be in control and so on. At the end, Pinky reverts into this weird childlike thing and I think she even calls Millie “mommy” a coupla times. Oh and I’m pretty sure they kill the married guy.

This shit was crazzzzzzzzy but clearly a great movie. And it was made the year I was born. So, there’s that.  I’ve gotta go to work.